Kalopsia:

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exhibition-ism:

Maude White's incredibly detailed and fragile paper cut works 

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:
Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.
A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.
When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.
She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.
Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.
Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.
Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

south-gothic:

roses—and—rue:

Zitkala-Ša, also known as Gertrude Simmons Bonnin, was the most amazing woman you’ve never heard of.

A writer, editor, musician, teacher and political activist, she was born on February 22, 1876 on the Yankton Indian Reservation in South Dakota. Her mother was Sioux and her father, who abandoned the family when she was very young, was European-American.

When she was eight, missionaries came to the res and took Zitkala-Ša along with several other children to the White’s Manual Labor Institute in Wabash, Indiana, one of many such institutions where Native children were forced to assimilate into white American culture. She studied piano and violin and eventually took the place of her teacher when she resigned. When she received her diploma in 1895, she delivered a speech on women’s rights.

She earned a scholarship to Earlham College, where she continued to study music. From 1897-99, she played with the New England Conservatory in Boston and played at the Paris Exposition in 1900. She collaborated with composer William F. Hanson on the world’s first Native American opera, based entirely on Sioux melodies that had previously existed only as oral tradition. She would play the melodies and Hanson transcribed them. The Sun Dance Opera debuted in 1913 to warm reviews, but I can find no recordings of it, and it seems it’s never performed.

Zitkala-Ša also wrote a number of collections of Native American stories and legends. She wrote them in Latin when she was at school and then translated them into English. She was the first Native person to do so in her own words, without a white editor or translator. In addition, she wrote extensively about her schooling and how it left her torn between her Sioux heritage and her assimilation into white culture. Her writings were published in The Atlantic Monthly and in Harper’s and she served as editor for the American Indian Magazine.

Unsurprisingly, most of her writings were political. She was a fierce yet charismatic advocate for Native American rights. Her efforts helped pass the Indian Citizenship Act and the Indian Reorganization Act. Having founded the National Coalition of American Indians, she spent the rest of her life fighting to protect our many indigenous communities from exploitation.

Her accomplishments were incredible- but have you ever heard of her? I had never heard of her either. Just another example of a history-changing woman omitted from the history books.

arsvitaest:

Rejected geisha from “Passions Cooled by Springtime Snow”

Author: Keisai Eisen (Japanese, 1790-1848)
Date: 1824
Medium: Color woodblock print
Location: The Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York

lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here

lovequotesrus:

Everything you love is here

(Source: iloveyoursoul)

kr4wr:

one of fave quotes :)

(Source: god-body)

designcloud:

(Source: ratak-monodosico)

rene-art:

jellyfishjulie:

I think we can all just agree that dragons are pretty cool…
But dragon designs in film and on television are so vanilla. Look! Look at what we could have! 

  1. Dragon Head - by “Veramudis
  2. I’m Fabulous -  by Katarzyna Marcinkowska “Grzanka" (Tumblr) 
  3. Dragon Mounts - by “V4m2c4
  4. Bluejay Dragon - by “Shinerai" (tumblr 1) (tumblr 2)
  5. Patterns- by “WhiteRaven" (tumblr) 
  6. Last Ones -  by “WhiteRaven(tumblr) 
  7. Classic Tabby Dragon - by Hillary Luetkemeyer “Hibbary
  8. Minty - by by “Shinerai(tumblr 1) (tumblr 2)

(Also these are all just incredible artists go shower them with attention.) 

This is why dragons are so awesome to draw; infinite possibilities and so much to learn and practice with! Would love it if movies, TV and even games tried to break away (or expand) from the typical Euro/Wyvern dragon.

I’ll never understand why funding for the arts is the first thing to get cut. Music is Math. Theatre is English. Tech is science. Dance is physical education. The arts are everything.

- Jay Armstrong Johnson (via opencurtains)

(Source: shogunofyellow)

mymodernmet:

SURE Architecture's Endless City is a fascinating proposal that transforms the skyscraper into a stunning, upright ecosystemThe structure’s multiple floors are meant as flexible areas that are adaptable for many situations. Plazas and communal spaces offer breathtaking views of the surrounding landscape.